Tombstone Tuesday : Anna Elisabeth (Hufnagel) Stern

George M. & Anna E. (Hufnagel) Stern marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.
George M. & Anna E. (Hufnagel) Stern marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.

Anna Elisabeth Hufnagel was born 29 August 1855 at Schwalbenmühle bei Windsbach, Mittelfranken, Bavaria.[1] She was the daughter of Georg Andreas Hufnagel and his wife, Eva Elisabeth (Böhm).[2] At 17 years old, she departed from Bremen and immigrated to the United States on board the S.S. Berlin, arriving at Baltimore, Maryland on 3 September 1872.[3] She appears to have traveled unaccompanied by any family members.[4] On 15 July 1877 she married George Michael Stern in Bay City, Bay County, Michigan.[5] Following her marriage, Anna Elisabeth resided in Frankenmuth, Saginaw, Michigan with her family.[6] She had one son.[7] Anna Elisabeth (Hufnagel) Stern died 29 November 1942 in Frankenmuth.[8] She is buried with her husband in St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery.[9]

How we are related: Anna Elisabeth is my second great-grandmother.

Reference Notes:

1. Tobias Brenner, compiler, “The Brenner Collection,” type- and manuscripts, n.d., family group record for Gg Andreas Hufnagel and Eva Els Böhm, married 26 November 1848; FHL microfilm 541,585.

2. Ibid.

3. “Baltimore, Passenger Lists, 1820-1964,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 September 2015), manifest, S. S. Berlin, Bremen to Baltimore, Maryland, arriving 3 September 1872, p. 13 (unpaginated), no. 425, Anna Hufnagel; citing National Archives microfilm publication M255, roll 020, list no. 109.

4. Ibid.

5. Bay County, Michigan, Marriage Registers, 1877, p. 58, no. 1594, George Michael Stern-Elisabeth Hufnagle [sic]; digital image, “Michigan Marriages, 1868-1925,” FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 26 August 2015); citing Michigan Department of Vital Records, Lansing.

6. See, for example, 1900 U.S. census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Frankenmuth Township, p. 199-B (stamped), enumeration district 34, dwelling 74, family 75, Anna E Stern; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 September 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, exact roll not cited for individual images.

7. Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Baptisms (1857-1885),” (typescript, 1995, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), pp. 263 & 4, Stern no. 317.

8. “Michigan Death Certificates, 1921-1952,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 26 August 2015), Anna E Stern, 29 November 1942; citing Michigan Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing.

9. St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery (Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan), Anna E Stern marker, section 2; personally read, 2012.

[Field Trip Friday] : The Historic Daniel Boone Home & Heritage Center

The Daniel Boone home, Defiance, Missouri; 2015.
The Daniel Boone home, Defiance, Missouri; 2015.

While visiting the St. Louis area this past spring, my mother and I paid a visit to The Historic Daniel Boone Home & Heritage Center in the beautiful rolling hills near the Missouri River Valley. Daniel Boone, you may recall, was a Virginia statesman, Revolutionary War soldier, frontiersman and folk hero. He is most famous for forging the Wilderness Road, a route used by pioneers from the East to reach Kentucky.

Note the gun port located  next to a first floor window, The Daniel Boone Home, Defiance, Missouri; 2015.
Note the gun port located next to a first floor window, The Daniel Boone Home, Defiance, Missouri; 2015.

The Boone home near Defiance, Missouri actually belonged to Daniel’s son Nathan. Daniel lived his final years here and died in the home on 26 September 1820. The interior of the home can only be seen by guided tour. Our guide was very knowledgeable on Boone’s history and that of the house. Surrounding the home is a small village of historic buildings also available to tour. More information is available on The Historic Daniel Boone Home & Heritage Center website.

Field Trip Friday : The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution, Old Presbyterian Meeting House Burial Ground, Alexandria, Virginia; 2013.
The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution, Old Presbyterian Meeting House Burial Ground, Alexandria, Virginia; 2013.

Unlike its counterparts of more recent American wars, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution does not lie at Arlington Cemetery. Instead, it can be found in the tiny church yard burial ground of the Old Presbyterian Meeting House in Alexandria, Virginia. It’s not grandiose in scale; in fact, it’s easy to miss. Hidden inside a walled court-yard, the inscribed table tomb lies behind an iron fence, quietly reminding passers-by of the heroism of our lesser known, and unknown, American fore-fathers.

Old Presbyterian Meeting House, Alexandria, Virginia.
Old Presbyterian Meeting House, Alexandria, Virginia; 2013.

This quiet resting placing should not be confused with the larger monument, The Tomb of the Unknown Revolutionary War Soldier, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Enjoy your Independence Day celebrations!