German Emigration Notices

German government-sponsored newspapers often carried notices of intention to emigrate. These notices include the name of the emigrant, his or her place of residency, and occupation or status. Sometimes they contain additional information on the emigrant’s family. More and more German newspapers are being digitized and placed online.

1845_emigration_Intelligenzblatt
1845 German newspaper emigration notices of several of the original settlers of Frankenmuth, Michigan.[1] Their town of origin as well as occupations or statuses are given.
This notice from 1845 contains the names and additional information on several of the original settlers of Frankenmuth, Michigan who came from Roßtall, Bavaria. It lists Martin Haspel, master weaver, with his wife and one child; Johann List, single journeyman carpenter; Johann Leonhard Bernthal (my second great-grandfather), single journeyman weaver; Johann Bierlein, single tenant farmer’s son; Kunigunda Bernthal, single wagon-maker’s daughter; and Anna Margaretha Walther, single ropemaker’s daughter.

Stern_1847_emigration_notice
1847 German newspaper emigration notice including the Johann Michael and Anna Sophia (Stern) Stern family of Brombach, Mittelfranken, Bavaria.[2] This notice provides the maiden names of the women emigrating with their husbands.
Another notice from 1847 includes the family of Johann Michael Stern (my third great-grandfather). It provides his residency as Brombach. It also provides the full name of his wife, including her maiden name. It states that Johann Michael was a Gütler, or smallholder/farmer, and that he was emigrating with his wife and four children.

Gugel_1859_emigration
1859 German newspaper emigration notice for the Georg Gugel family.[3] This notice provides full names and the birthdates of Georg’s children.
This notice for the Georg Gugel family who immigrated to Frankenmuth in 1859 is particularly valuable as it lists the full names of all of his children who are emigrating, as well as their birthdates.

Several websites include some of these newspapers where the emigration notices can be found including Google Books, Internet Archive, and Bavarica for papers specifically from Bavaria, Germany. These government-sponsored newspapers are usually titled “Intelligenzblatt” or “Amtsblatt.” Searching for one of these titles plus a locality (such as “Mittelfranken”) will return several results. Searching with the surname of interest may or may not return results; optical character recognition (OCR) is not perfect, and in my experience, even less-so with the Fraktur font used in these publications.

A helpful and amazing finding-aid for emigration notices published in newspapers in Mittelfranken, or Central Franconia, Bavaria from 1837-1874 was produced by the City of Gunzenhausen, Germany. Staff of the Frankenmuth Historical Association translated and compiled the information they provided. The finding-aid is published on the Saginaw (Michigan) Genealogy Society, Inc.’s website. This index includes not only immigrants to Frankenmuth and the surrounding Franconian colonies but throughout North America. Included in the index are the emigrant’s name, status and/or occupation, place of residency in Bavaria, North American destination when known, possible additional information on the emigrant’s birth or family, and, importantly, a reference to the newspaper where the notice can be found.

German newspapers are a great source of information on one’s ancestor’s immigration to North America, particularly when ships’ manifests can not be located or are extant. Emigration notices may hold the key to the ancestor’s village or town of origin, as well.

Reference Notes:

1. Königlich Bayerisches Intelligenzblatt für Mittelfranken: 1845 (Ansbach, Bayern: Brügel, 1845), 26 February 1845, cols. 361 & 62, item no. 8; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com : accessed 13 February 2016).

2. Königlich Bayerisches Intelligenzblatt für Mittelfranken (Ansbach, Bayern: Brügel, 1847), 24 February 1847, cols. 331 & 32, item no. 8; digital images, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Bavarica (http://bavarica.digitale-sammlungen.de : accessed 13 February 2016).

3. Königlich Bayerisches Kreis-Amtsblatte von Mittelfranken 1859 (Ansbach, Bayern: Brügel, 1859), no. 4, 15 January 1859, cols. 60 & 61, item no. 5; digital images, Bayerische StattsBibliothek, Bavarica (http://bavarica.digitale-sammlungen.de : accessed 17 February 2016).

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Relating the Two Stern Families of Frankenmuth

My curiosity in the Stern families of Frankenmuth, Michigan stems from my paternal grandmother who was a Stern. She was a descendant of Johann Michael Stern and his wife Anna Sophia (Stern). (To clarify, Anna Sophia’s maiden name was also Stern.)[1] They were the parents in the second Stern family to arrive in Frankenmuth, emigrating in 1847.[2] The first Stern family to arrive there was headed by Georg Martin Stern and his wife, Anna Sophia (Kraus). They emigrated in 1846 aboard the Brig George Duckwitz with the second wave of settlers to Frankenmuth.[3]

Early into my genealogical endeavors, I began to wonder how and if the two original Stern families of Frankenmuth were related. Odds are they were; both families originated nearby one another in Mittelfranken, Bavaria (see following paragraph). They both immigrated within about a one year span to the same settlement in North America.[4] The two families shared not just a surname but many given names, as well.[5] The challenge was finding evidence that the two families were indeed related. No examined North American sources provided this evidence. It would likely be necessary to explore German documents to find the answer to the research question.

Articles from a German government-sponsored newspaper provided emigration information and the names of the villages of origin of the two Stern families. Georg Martin & Anna Sophia (Kraus) Stern hailed from the village of Gräfensteinberg, Landgericht Gunzenhausen, Mittelfranken, Bavaria.[6] Brombach, Landgericht Gunzenhausen was given as the place of residency for Johann Michael & Anna Sophia (Stern) Stern.[7] Brombach lies approximately 1.3 kilometers south of Gräfensteinberg.

Grafensteinberg_Brombach_map
Detail, 1893 map depicting Gräfensteinberg and Brombach (upper right).[8]
Since civil vital-record registration did not begin in Bavaria until 1876, it was essential to consult German church records in an effort to determine the relationship between the two families.[9] The 1801 birth and and 1832 marriage records for Anna Sophia Stern, wife of Johann Michael Stern, revealed her parents as Johann Michael Stern and Anna Sophia (Stotz).[10] The 1797 birth record for Georg Martin Stern indicated the same parentage as that of Anna Sophia Stern.[11] Both children were born at Gräfensteinberg in house number 22.[12]

Thus, the two original Stern families of Frankenmuth are related. Georg Martin Stern, father of the Stern family to immigrate in 1846, was brother to Anna Sophia (Stern) Stern, wife of Johann Michael Stern and mother in the family to immigrate in 1847.

In an effort to construct my Stern pedigree, I continued research in the parish records of Gräfensteinberg. Stern proved to not be a particularly common surname within the parish records (which also includes the records for Brombach). It was plausible that Anna Sophia (Stern) Stern was related to her husband outside the bonds of marriage.

Johann Michael Stern, the husband of Anna Sophia (Stern), was born in 1806, the son of Leonhard Michael Stern and his wife.[13] Records show the parents of Leonhard Michael Stern as Johann Conrad Stern and Anna Margaretha (Huber).[14]

Parish records disclose that Johann Michael Stern, the father of Anna Sophia (Stern) Stern, was also the son of Johann Conrad Stern and his wife Anna Margaretha.[15] This results in Johann Michael Stern, the 1847 emigrant to North America, marrying his first cousin Anna Sophia Stern.[16] This Johann Michael Stern was also therefore a first cousin to Georg Martin Stern, the 1846 emigrant and brother to his wife.

Research is presently on-going to reconstruct the German lineage of the Stern families of Frankenmuth. Thus far, investigation reveals a continuous line of Sterns residing in the Gräfensteinberg parish from the middle-1800s extending back into the 17th century.

Reference Notes:

1. Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book I: (1847-1857),” (typescript, 1990, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Office, Frankenmuth), no. 41.

2. “8. Bekanntmachung beabsichtigter Auswanderungen nach Nordamerika,” Königlich Bayerisches Intelligenzblatt für Mittelfranken (Ansbach, Bayern: Brügel, 1847), 24 February 1847, cols. 331 & 32; digital images, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München, Bavarica (http://bavarica.digitale-sammlungen.de : accessed 13 February 2016).

3. “7. Bekanntmachung der beabsichtigter Auswanderungen nach Nordamerika,” Königlich Bayerisches Intelligenzblatt für Mittelfranken (Ansbach, Bayern: Brügel, 1846), 31 January 1846, cols. 165 & 66; digital images, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München, Bavarica (http://bavarica.digitale-sammlungen.de : accessed 13 February 2016).

“New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 February 2014), manifest, Brig George Duckwitz, Bremen to New York, arriving 9 May 1846, p. 2, Martin Stein [sic] family; citing National Archives microfilm publication M237, roll 61.

4. Ibid.

“7. Bekanntmachung der beabsichtigter Auswanderungen nach Nordamerika,” cols. 165 & 66.

“8. Bekanntmachung beabsichtigter Auswanderungen nach Nordamerika,” cols. 331 & 32.

5. Ibid.

“New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” digital images, Ancestry.com, manifest, Brig George Duckwitz, Bremen to New York, arriving 9 May 1846, p. 2, Martin Stein [sic] family.

Huber, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book I: (1847-1857),” no. 41.

6. “7. Bekanntmachung der beabsichtigter Auswanderungen nach Nordamerika,” cols. 165 & 66.

7. “8. Bekanntmachung beabsichtigter Auswanderungen nach Nordamerika,” cols. 331 & 32.

8. Reichsamt fur Landesaufnahme, Karte des Deutschen Reiches: Sheet 577, Gunzenhausen, composite (n. p. [Germany]: Reichsamt fur Landesaufnahme, 1893); digital image, David Rumsey Map Collection (http://www.davidrumsey.com : 2 March 2016).

9. Holly T. Hansen, compiler, German Research Guide (Morgan, Utah: Family History Expos, Inc., 2015), 88.

10. St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 407, no. 15, Anna Sophia Stern (1801); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 11 February 2016).

St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Trauungen [Marriages] 1812-1870, pp. 6 & 7, no. 3, Stern-Stern (1832); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 11 February 2016).

11. St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 377, no. 8, Georg Martin Stern (1797); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 17 February 2016).

12. St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 407, no. 15, Anna Sophia Stern (1801).

St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 377, no. 8, Georg Martin Stern (1797).

13. St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 473, no. 47, Johann Michael Stern (1806); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 11 February 2016).

14. St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 163, no. 25, Leonhard Michael Stern (1774); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 11 February 2016).

15. St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 130, no. 18, Johann Michael Stern (1768); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 3 March 2016).

16. In genealogical terms, this illustrates what is known as pedigree collapse; that is, a reduction in the number of distinct ancestors of an individual. (And before the jokes begin, let me remind you that pedigree collapse exists in the family trees of every human.) For more information see “Pedigree collapse,” Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedigree_collapse : 2 March 2016).

Behind-the-Scenes Tours of St. Lorenz

St_Lorenz_Church_video
St. Lorenz Lutheran Church, Frankenmuth, Michigan; still, St. Lorenz Foundation, The Church You May Not Know (Frankenmuth, Michigan: St. Lorenz Foundation, n.d.).

If you’re curious to learn more about the history of Frankenmuth’s St. Lorenz Lutheran Church, check out the videos posted on the St. Lorenz Lutheran Church and School website. The first video shares the history of St. Lorenz Lutheran Church and showcases the stories behind the edifice’s stained-glass windows. The second video, titled The Church You May Not Know, shares some “behind-the-scenes” footage including views from the bell tower and the transept’s dome.

 

Tombstone Tuesday : Johann Georg Veitengruber

Post edited 1 March 2016 to correct name of birth mother.

In honor of tomorrow’s Veterans Day commemoration, this posting remembers a Frankenmuth veteran.

Johann Georg Veitengruber grave marker, St Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.
Johann Georg Veitengruber grave marker, St Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.

Johann Georg Veitengruber was born at Gräfensteinberg, Mittelfranken, Bayern (Bavaria) on 11 August 1836, the son of Johann Michael Veitengruber and Anna Margaretha (Bartel).[1] He died at the Eastern Michigan Asylum, Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan on 12 December 1894.[2] He was buried at St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Saginaw, Michigan on 16 December 1894.[3]

Johann Georg immigrated to the United States accompanied by his parents and siblings with the second group of settlers that came to Frankenmuth. They sailed from Bremen aboard the Brig Georg Duckwitz which arrived at New York on 9 May 1846.[4]

At 25 year old, “George” enlisted with the U.S. Army on 23 September 1861 in Company M, 3rd Regiment Michigan Calvary, during the American Civil War. He served the company as a farrier/blacksmith. While serving he became sick and was discharged for disability on 26 August 1862. He suffered from chronic rheumatism.[5]

Following the Civil War, George farmed at Frankenmuth Township.[6] By June 1890 he was housed at the Eastern Michigan Asylum at Pontiac where he died.[7] George did not marry.

How we are related: George is my second great grand uncle.

Reference Notes:

[1] St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 66, no. 17, Johann Georg Veitengruber (1836); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 10 February 2016).

[2] “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan) Burials 1858-1916” (typescript, 1993-, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), 1894: 4, Joh. Geo. Veitengruber.

[3] ibid.

[4] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), manifest image, Brig Georg Duckwitz, Bremen to New York, arriving 9 May 1846, p. 2, Joh. Mich Veitengruber family; citing National Archives microfilm publication M237, roll 61, list no. 280.

[5] Compiled service record, George Veitengruber, Co. M, 3 Michigan Calvary; Carded Records, Volunteer Organizations, Civil War; Record Group 94; Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s-1917; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[6] 1870 U.S. Census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Frankenmuth Township, p. 19, line no. 28, dwelling 119, family 120, J. Georg Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 702.

1880 U.S. Census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Frankenmuth [Township], enumeration district (ED) 308, p. 13, line no. 21, dwelling 108, family 109, Johann George Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 602.

[7] 1890 U.S. Census, Oakland County, Michigan, “Special Schedule: Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, and Widows,” Eastern Michigan Asylum, ED Special, p. 1, no. 11, John G. Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication M123, roll 18.

Tombstone Tuesday : Auguste Yustine (Schmandt) (Treptow) Block

C. F. William & Yustine Block grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.
C. F. William & Yustine Block grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.

Yustine was born at Karwenbruch, Kreis Putzig, Westpreußen, Prussia, 28 November 1838, the daughter of Martin and Luise (Juni) Schmandt.[1] She was baptized at the Evangelisch church at nearby Krockow on 9 December 1838.[2] Under the auspice of the same parish she married Gottlieb Johann Treptow on 28 November 1867.[3] On 20 July 1870, Yustine departed Hamburg with her husband and three children, including twin infants, aboard the S.S. Hammonia.[4] Less than two weeks later they arrived at New York on 1 August.[5] They settled at Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan where Yustine gave birth to three daughters.[6]

Following the death of her husband in 1877[7], Yustine married Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Block at Frankenmuth at St. Lorenz Lutheran Church on 1 September 1880.[8] They farmed at Birch Run Township, Saginaw County.[9] She had one more daughter with this husband.[10] Yustine died at Saginaw, Saginaw County on 16 November 1931, less than two weeks shy of her ninety-third birthday.[11] She is buried with her second husband at St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth.[12]

How we are related: Yustine is my second great-grandmother.

Reference Notes:

[1] Evangelische Kirche Krockow (Kreis Putzig, Westpreußen, Prussia), Kirchenbuch 1824-1846, births and baptisms, unpaginated, 1838, no. 100, Yustine Schmandt; Family History Library (FHL) microfilm 245,382.

[2] ibid.

[3] Evangelische Kirche Krockow (Kreis Putzig, Westpreußen, Prussia), Heiratsregister 1847-1944, unpaginated, 1867, no. 20, Gottlieb Joh Treptow & Auguste Eva Schmandt; FHL microfilm 245,381, item 4.

[4] “Hamburg Passenger Lists, 1850-1934,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 October 2015), manifest image, Hammonia, Hamburg to New York, leaving 20 July 1870, p. 642, line nos. 335-39, Johann Treptow family; citing Bestand [inventory no.] 373-7I, VIII (Auswanderungsamt I), Direkt Band [vol.] 024; Staatsarchiv Hamburg microfilm no. K_1715.

[5] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 October 2015), manifest image, Harmonia [S.S. Hammonia], Hamburg to New York, arriving 1 August 1870, unpaginated, line nos. 333-37, Joh. Treptow family; citing National Archives microfilm publication M237, roll 332.

[6] Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Baptisms (1857-1885),” (typescript, 1995, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Office, Frankenmuth), pp. 32-34, Block, no. 31.

[7] Huber, Elaine, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Burials (1858-1885).” (typescript, 1993, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Office, Frankenmuth), 1877, p. 1, Gottlieb Johann Treptow.

[8] Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Baptisms (1857-1885),” (typescript, 1995, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Office, Frankenmuth), p. 32, Block, no. 31.

[9] 1900 U.S. census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Birch Run Township, enumeration district 22, sheet 9-B, dwelling 204, family 204, William C. Block household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 October 2015); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 739.

[10] Huber, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Baptisms (1857-1885), pp. 32-34, Block, no. 31.

[11] “Death Records, 1921-1947,” database and images, Michigan History Foundation, Seeking Michigan (http://seekingmichigan.org : accessed 24 October 2015), death certificate image, Saginaw County, no. 17310466 (state office no.), Yustina Block, 16 November 1931.

[12] St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery (Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan), C. F. William & Yustine Block marker, section 03; personally read, 2012.

St. Lorenz : A Singing Church

“…I think I can say without exaggeration that there are not many other churches in our Synod that could be compared with Frankenmuth in this respect. I remember that President Schwan and others who, when I was pastor there, came to Frankenmuth from Saginaw on synodical Sunday were deeply impressed by the service, especially the powerful singing of the Lutheran chorales. Everybody joined in singing, men and women, old and young, and the congregation was really a ‘singende Kirche.’”[1]

-Ludwig Ernest Fuerbringer, Pastor of St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan) from 1885-1893

Reference Notes:

[1] Ludwig Ernest Fuerbringer, 80 Eventful Years: Reminiscences of Ludwig Ernest Fuerbringer (St Louis, Missouri: Concordia Publishing House, 1944), 156; digital images, Hathi Trust (https://www.hathitrust.org : accessed 8 October 2015).