Tombstone Tuesday : Johann Georg Veitengruber

Post edited 1 March 2016 to correct name of birth mother.

In honor of tomorrow’s Veterans Day commemoration, this posting remembers a Frankenmuth veteran.

Johann Georg Veitengruber grave marker, St Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.
Johann Georg Veitengruber grave marker, St Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.

Johann Georg Veitengruber was born at Gräfensteinberg, Mittelfranken, Bayern (Bavaria) on 11 August 1836, the son of Johann Michael Veitengruber and Anna Margaretha (Bartel).[1] He died at the Eastern Michigan Asylum, Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan on 12 December 1894.[2] He was buried at St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Saginaw, Michigan on 16 December 1894.[3]

Johann Georg immigrated to the United States accompanied by his parents and siblings with the second group of settlers that came to Frankenmuth. They sailed from Bremen aboard the Brig Georg Duckwitz which arrived at New York on 9 May 1846.[4]

At 25 year old, “George” enlisted with the U.S. Army on 23 September 1861 in Company M, 3rd Regiment Michigan Calvary, during the American Civil War. He served the company as a farrier/blacksmith. While serving he became sick and was discharged for disability on 26 August 1862. He suffered from chronic rheumatism.[5]

Following the Civil War, George farmed at Frankenmuth Township.[6] By June 1890 he was housed at the Eastern Michigan Asylum at Pontiac where he died.[7] George did not marry.

How we are related: George is my second great grand uncle.

Reference Notes:

[1] St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 66, no. 17, Johann Georg Veitengruber (1836); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 10 February 2016).

[2] “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan) Burials 1858-1916” (typescript, 1993-, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), 1894: 4, Joh. Geo. Veitengruber.

[3] ibid.

[4] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), manifest image, Brig Georg Duckwitz, Bremen to New York, arriving 9 May 1846, p. 2, Joh. Mich Veitengruber family; citing National Archives microfilm publication M237, roll 61, list no. 280.

[5] Compiled service record, George Veitengruber, Co. M, 3 Michigan Calvary; Carded Records, Volunteer Organizations, Civil War; Record Group 94; Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s-1917; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[6] 1870 U.S. Census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Frankenmuth Township, p. 19, line no. 28, dwelling 119, family 120, J. Georg Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 702.

1880 U.S. Census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Frankenmuth [Township], enumeration district (ED) 308, p. 13, line no. 21, dwelling 108, family 109, Johann George Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 602.

[7] 1890 U.S. Census, Oakland County, Michigan, “Special Schedule: Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, and Widows,” Eastern Michigan Asylum, ED Special, p. 1, no. 11, John G. Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication M123, roll 18.

Tombstone Tuesday : Auguste Yustine (Schmandt) (Treptow) Block

C. F. William & Yustine Block grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.
C. F. William & Yustine Block grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.

Yustine was born at Karwenbruch, Kreis Putzig, Westpreußen, Prussia, 28 November 1838, the daughter of Martin and Luise (Juni) Schmandt.[1] She was baptized at the Evangelisch church at nearby Krockow on 9 December 1838.[2] Under the auspice of the same parish she married Gottlieb Johann Treptow on 28 November 1867.[3] On 20 July 1870, Yustine departed Hamburg with her husband and three children, including twin infants, aboard the S.S. Hammonia.[4] Less than two weeks later they arrived at New York on 1 August.[5] They settled at Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan where Yustine gave birth to three daughters.[6]

Following the death of her husband in 1877[7], Yustine married Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Block at Frankenmuth at St. Lorenz Lutheran Church on 1 September 1880.[8] They farmed at Birch Run Township, Saginaw County.[9] She had one more daughter with this husband.[10] Yustine died at Saginaw, Saginaw County on 16 November 1931, less than two weeks shy of her ninety-third birthday.[11] She is buried with her second husband at St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth.[12]

How we are related: Yustine is my second great-grandmother.

Reference Notes:

[1] Evangelische Kirche Krockow (Kreis Putzig, Westpreußen, Prussia), Kirchenbuch 1824-1846, births and baptisms, unpaginated, 1838, no. 100, Yustine Schmandt; Family History Library (FHL) microfilm 245,382.

[2] ibid.

[3] Evangelische Kirche Krockow (Kreis Putzig, Westpreußen, Prussia), Heiratsregister 1847-1944, unpaginated, 1867, no. 20, Gottlieb Joh Treptow & Auguste Eva Schmandt; FHL microfilm 245,381, item 4.

[4] “Hamburg Passenger Lists, 1850-1934,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 October 2015), manifest image, Hammonia, Hamburg to New York, leaving 20 July 1870, p. 642, line nos. 335-39, Johann Treptow family; citing Bestand [inventory no.] 373-7I, VIII (Auswanderungsamt I), Direkt Band [vol.] 024; Staatsarchiv Hamburg microfilm no. K_1715.

[5] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 October 2015), manifest image, Harmonia [S.S. Hammonia], Hamburg to New York, arriving 1 August 1870, unpaginated, line nos. 333-37, Joh. Treptow family; citing National Archives microfilm publication M237, roll 332.

[6] Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Baptisms (1857-1885),” (typescript, 1995, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Office, Frankenmuth), pp. 32-34, Block, no. 31.

[7] Huber, Elaine, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Burials (1858-1885).” (typescript, 1993, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Office, Frankenmuth), 1877, p. 1, Gottlieb Johann Treptow.

[8] Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Baptisms (1857-1885),” (typescript, 1995, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Office, Frankenmuth), p. 32, Block, no. 31.

[9] 1900 U.S. census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Birch Run Township, enumeration district 22, sheet 9-B, dwelling 204, family 204, William C. Block household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 October 2015); citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 739.

[10] Huber, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Baptisms (1857-1885), pp. 32-34, Block, no. 31.

[11] “Death Records, 1921-1947,” database and images, Michigan History Foundation, Seeking Michigan (http://seekingmichigan.org : accessed 24 October 2015), death certificate image, Saginaw County, no. 17310466 (state office no.), Yustina Block, 16 November 1931.

[12] St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery (Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan), C. F. William & Yustine Block marker, section 03; personally read, 2012.

Tombstone Tuesday : Sahrah Miksiwe

Sahrah Miksiwe headstone, Bethany Lutheran Indian Cemetery, St. Louis, Michigan.
Sahrah Miksiwe headstone, Bethany Lutheran Indian Cemetery, St. Louis, Michigan.

Sahrah Miksiwe was a Chippewa woman. She is buried at Bethany Lutheran Indian Cemetery along the Pine River near St. Louis, Michigan. The inscription on her small headstone reads:

Sahrah Miksiwe

Mother of the Chippewa

Died 110 Years Old

In Christ

12 April 18[?]

Gen. 49:18

I have waited for Thy

salvation, O Lord. [1]

Reference Notes:

[1] Bethany Lutheran Indian Cemetery (Riverside Drive, St. Louis, Gratiot County, Michigan), Sahrah Miksiwe marker; personally read, 2012. The year of death is partially illegible.

E. R. Baierlein, Anitz Z. Boldt, translator, and Harold W. Moll, editor, In the Wildnerness with the Red Indians (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1996), 143. An appendix to this volume listing the burials at Bethany Lutheran Indian Cemetery transcribes the year of Sahrah Miksiwe’s death as 1859.

Tombstone Tuesday : Johann Georg Leonhardt & Anna Abalonia (Heinlein) Weber

Johann G. L. & Anna A. (Heinlein) Weber grave marker, St. Michael's Lutheran Cemetery, Richville, Michigan; 2012.
Johann G. L. & Anna A. (Heinlein) Weber grave marker, St. Michael’s Lutheran Cemetery, Richville, Michigan; 2012.

In honor of Veterans Day it is fitting to remember Johann Georg Leonhardt Weber (25 April 1847-21 May 1910).[1] Johann, or John, was born in Frankenmuth, the oldest child of two of Frankenmuth’s original founding settlers, Johann Conrad Weber and Kunigunde Barbara (Bernthal). John Weber fought in the American Civil War. At age seventeen he enlisted in the United States Army on 17 August 1864 in Company D, 29th Michigan Infantry.[2] The regiment participated in battles in Decatur, Alabama and Overall Creek, Winsted Church, Shelbyville Pike, and Nolansville, Tennessee.[3]

On 20 April 1876 John was married in Richville, Michigan to Anna Abalonia Heinlein (7 October 1852-19 January 1931).[4][5] The couple was married by the groom’s uncle, Rev. George Bernthal. They lived in Denmark Township, Tuscola County where John farmed.[6]

John and his wife both died in Denmark Township.[7] They are buried in St. Michael’s Lutheran Cemetery, Richville. Three children who died early are also inscribed on their grave marker.[8]

Reference Notes:

[1]Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan, Book I: (1847-1857),” (typescript, 1990, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), unpaginated, no. 4.

Tuscola County, Michigan, death certificate no. 9, John G. Weber, 21 May 1910; digital image, “Michigan, Death Records, 1897-1920,” The Archives of Michigan, Seeking Michigan (http://www.seekingmichigan.org : accessed 16 August 2012).

[2]Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in the Civil War, 1861-1865, 46 vols. (Kalamazoo, Michigan: Ihling Bros. & Everard, 1903[?]), 29: 68; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 November 2014).

[3]Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in the Civil War, 1861-1865, 29: 1 & 2.

[4]Tuscola County, Michigan, Marriage Registers [vol. ?], fo. 239, J. George Weber-Anna A. Heinlein, 30 April 1876; digital images, FamilySearch, ”Michigan, Marriages, 1868-1925” (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQS8-BQX : accessed 10 November 2014).

[5]Tuscola County, Michigan, “Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KF7N-P8X : accessed 10 November 2014), entry for Anna Abalonia Weber, 19 January 1931.

[6]1900 U.S. census, Tuscola County, Michigan, population schedule, Denmark Township, enumeration district 109, sheet no. 5 A, dwelling 96, family 97, John G. and Abelonia [sic] Weber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 November 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 744.

[7]Tuscola County, Michigan, death certificate no. 9, John G. Weber, 21 May 1910.

Tuscola County, Michigan, “Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952,” database entry for Anna Abalonia Weber, 19 January 1931.

[8]St. Michael’s Lutheran Cemetery (Richville, Michigan), Johann G. L. & Anna A. Weber marker; personally read, 2012.

Tombstone Tuesday : Ann Bernthal

Ann Bernthal grave marker, Zion Lutheran Church Cemetery, Bonfield, Kankakee County, Illinois.
Ann Bernthal grave marker, Zion Lutheran Church Cemetery, Bonfield, Kankakee County, Illinois.

Ann Bernthal (1861-28 September 1861) was the daughter of Rev. Georg Bernthal and his first wife Maria née Von Renner. Little is known about Ann. Transcribed church records note she died the same day as her mother.[1] Her grave marker reads she was 8 months old.[2] She is buried at Zion Lutheran Church Cemetery, Bonfield, Pilot Township, Kankakee County, Illinois where her father was minister.

Maria (Von Renner) Bernthal (about 1840-28 September 1861) emigrated with her family from Prussia, arriving in the United States on 23 June 1855.[3] She married Rev. Georg Bernthal in 1860 in Kankakee County.[4] Maria was the sister of August Karl Woldemar Von Renner who was a college classmate to her husband.[5] Prior to her marriage, she resided with her parents in Bremen Township, Cook County, Illinois where her father farmed.[6] Maria is remembered to have died from a rattlesnake bite.[7] There is no extant headstone to mark her grave.[8]

Sources

[1]Kankakee Valley Genealogy Society, Pilot Township Cemetery Book (Bourbonnais, Illinois: Kankakee Valley Genealogy Society, 1997), 20 & 24.

[2]Zion Lutheran Church Cemetery (Bonfield, Kankakee County, Illinois), Ann Bernthal marker, personally read, September 2012.

[3]”New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 April 2014), manifest, Bark Copernicus, 23 June 1855, list stamped 540, “Erste Cajute” [First Class] line no. 4, Maria von Renner, age 15; citing microfilm publication M237 (Washington: National Archives and Records Administration), roll 153.

[4]”Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900,” database, Illinois Secretary of State, (http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/databases/marriage.html : accessed 13 July 2014), entry for George Branshal-Mary Renner, 30 August 1860, citing Kankakee County, Illinois [Marriages] Vol. 00B, license no. 00000427.

[5]“Jubilee Celebration and Most Remarkable Tribute to Lutheran Pastor and Teacher,” The Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, 15 August 1909; digital images, Ancestry.com , Historical Newspapers Collection.

[6]1860 U.S. census, Cook County, Illinois, population schedule, Township of Bremen, p. 73, dwelling 572, family 548, Woldemar Von Renner; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 July 2014), citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll 169.

[7]Lavon Wilcox, compiler, Pilot Township (n.p.: Kankakee County Bicentennial Commission, c. 1976), 69.

[8]Zion Lutheran Church Cemetery (Bonfield, Kankakee County, Illinois), grave markers, personally read, September 2012.

Tombstone Tuesday : Anna (Gallmeyer) Rook

Anna (Gallmeyer) Rook headstone, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Ruth, Huron County, Michigan.
Anna (Gallmeyer) Rook headstone, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Ruth, Huron County, Michigan.

Anna Christina Caroline (nee Gallmeyer) Rook (29 September 1884-28 September 1915) was born in Preble Township, Adams County, Indiana, the fifteenth of sixteen children born to Friedrich Wilhelm and Wilhelmina (nee Boese) Gallmeyer.[1] She married Rudolph August Rook, a young minister, on 20 July 1913 at Zion Lutheran Church in Friedheim, Adams County, Indiana.[2] Anna died one day short of her thirty-second birthday in Ruth, Huron County, Michigan where her husband preached at the local Lutheran church. She had one son. Family lore said she died in child birth; her death certificate records “hemorrhage of brain” as the cause of death.[3]

Anna is buried at Zion Lutheran Cemetery in Sherman Township, Huron County, Michigan. A worn and crooked headstone with only her name “Anna” legible lies to the left of a larger Rook family marker; however, no other headstones share the Rook plot.[4]

Rook family grave marker, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Ruth, Huron County, Michigan.
Rook family grave marker, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Ruth, Huron County, Michigan.

Sources

[1]Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church (Friedheim, Indiana), “Adams County, Indiana; Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church – Friedheim; Record Book 1879-1926,” p. 73, no. 18, Anna Christina Caroline Gallmeyer baptism (1884); Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

[2]Marvin Hinkle, compiler, “Church Records; Zion Lutheran Church – Friedheim [1836-1975]” (typescript, 1982), p. 142, no. 2398, Rudolph Aug. Rook-Anna Gallmeyer marriage (1913).

[3]Huron County, Michigan, death certificate no. 20, Anna Rook, 28 September 1915; digital image, The Archives of Michigan (http://seekingmichigan.org : accessed 08 July 2014), “Michigan, Death Records, 1897-1920.” Anna’s death certificate provides a day of birth different than recorded on her baptismal record.

[4]Zion Lutheran Cemetery (Ruth, Huron County, Michigan), “Anna” and “Rook” markers, personally read, May 2012.

 

Tombstone Tuesday : Margaretha Barbara (Hildner) Bernthal

Margareth Barbara (Hildner) Bernthal grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.
Margareth Barbara (Hildner) Bernthal grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.

Margaretha Barbara (Hildner) Bernthal (12 February 1827-06 January 1895) immigrated to the United States from Germany sometime prior to her marriage to Georg Konrad Bernthal on 02 August 1854.[1] She died of dropsy and was survived by six children and twenty-eight grandchildren.[2] The deceased is laid to rest in St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery not far from her husband.[3]

[1]Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan, Book I: (1847-1857)” (typescript, 1990, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), No. 121. This family record provides her birth date as 11 February 1827.

[2]”St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan) Burials 1858-1916″ (typescript, 1993-, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), 1895 : 1.

[3]St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery (Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Michigan), Margareth Barbara Bernthal and Georg Konrad Bernthal markers, section 01; personally read, 2012.