Tombstone Tuesday : Johann Georg Veitengruber

Post edited 1 March 2016 to correct name of birth mother.

In honor of tomorrow’s Veterans Day commemoration, this posting remembers a Frankenmuth veteran.

Johann Georg Veitengruber grave marker, St Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.
Johann Georg Veitengruber grave marker, St Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan; 2012.

Johann Georg Veitengruber was born at Gräfensteinberg, Mittelfranken, Bayern (Bavaria) on 11 August 1836, the son of Johann Michael Veitengruber and Anna Margaretha (Bartel).[1] He died at the Eastern Michigan Asylum, Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan on 12 December 1894.[2] He was buried at St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Saginaw, Michigan on 16 December 1894.[3]

Johann Georg immigrated to the United States accompanied by his parents and siblings with the second group of settlers that came to Frankenmuth. They sailed from Bremen aboard the Brig Georg Duckwitz which arrived at New York on 9 May 1846.[4]

At 25 year old, “George” enlisted with the U.S. Army on 23 September 1861 in Company M, 3rd Regiment Michigan Calvary, during the American Civil War. He served the company as a farrier/blacksmith. While serving he became sick and was discharged for disability on 26 August 1862. He suffered from chronic rheumatism.[5]

Following the Civil War, George farmed at Frankenmuth Township.[6] By June 1890 he was housed at the Eastern Michigan Asylum at Pontiac where he died.[7] George did not marry.

How we are related: George is my second great grand uncle.

Reference Notes:

[1] St. Martinskirche von Gräfensteinberg (Gräfensteinberg, Bayern, Germany), Taufen [Baptisms] 1753-1836, p. 66, no. 17, Johann Georg Veitengruber (1836); browsable images, Archion (https://www.archion.de : 10 February 2016).

[2] “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan) Burials 1858-1916” (typescript, 1993-, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), 1894: 4, Joh. Geo. Veitengruber.

[3] ibid.

[4] “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), manifest image, Brig Georg Duckwitz, Bremen to New York, arriving 9 May 1846, p. 2, Joh. Mich Veitengruber family; citing National Archives microfilm publication M237, roll 61, list no. 280.

[5] Compiled service record, George Veitengruber, Co. M, 3 Michigan Calvary; Carded Records, Volunteer Organizations, Civil War; Record Group 94; Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s-1917; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[6] 1870 U.S. Census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Frankenmuth Township, p. 19, line no. 28, dwelling 119, family 120, J. Georg Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 702.

1880 U.S. Census, Saginaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Frankenmuth [Township], enumeration district (ED) 308, p. 13, line no. 21, dwelling 108, family 109, Johann George Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 602.

[7] 1890 U.S. Census, Oakland County, Michigan, “Special Schedule: Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, and Widows,” Eastern Michigan Asylum, ED Special, p. 1, no. 11, John G. Veitengruber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 November 2015), citing National Archives microfilm publication M123, roll 18.

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Surname Saturday : Geogen Surname Mapping in Germany

Geogen Surname Mapping is a website created by Christoph Stöpel that graphically displays the current geographical distribution of surnames in Germany based on telephone book data. This tool may help in identifying the origins of a particular surname or in locating living relations in the old country.

I entered a few of my German surnames to see if there were still individuals living in Germany with those names. “Bernthal” and its German forms of “Bärenthal” and “Baerenthal” did not produce any hits. “Berenthal,” perhaps another variant form, did return ten entries; however, none were located near our family’s origins in Bärenthal, Tuttlingen, Baden-Württemberg and Roßtal, Fürth, Bavaria.

“Veitengruber,” another family surname, was more successful returning 92 entries. The largest concentration was in Landkreis Weißenburg-Gunzenhausen, Bavaria with twenty-two phonebook listings. Interestingly, this is the area from where my second great-grandmother and her family originated.

"Veitengruber" surname distribution map. Source: Geogen Surname Mapping; 2014.
“Veitengruber” surname distribution map. Source: Geogen Surname Mapping; 2014.

 

The Geogen website can be visited here: Geogen Surname Mapping.

Tombstone Tuesday!

J. Leonhard and Maria Margaretha (née Veitengruber) headstone, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.
Johann Leonhard Bernthal, founder’s marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.

It seems only fitting to begin this blog in remembrance of my 2nd Great Grandfather Johann Leonhard Bernthal (27 September 1821 – 17 January 1911) who passed away 103 years ago this week in Frankenmuth, Michigan, a community he along with fourteen other brave souls founded in 1845.  He is laid to rest in St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery with his wife Maria Margaretha née Veitengruber (02 November 1827 – 14 November 1905).Read More »