Military Monday : 29th Michigan Infantry. Rally, Boys!

29th Michigan Infantry recruitment poster; 1864.
29th Michigan Infantry recruitment broadside; 1864.[1]
This past November Johann Georg Leonhardt Weber (a.k.a. John G. Weber) was featured in a Tombstone Tuesday post on FrankenGen. Through my research, I believe that John G. is the only direct Bernthal descendant to serve in the United States Civil War. The Civil War fascinates me in general, and family involvement interests me particularly. For this reason, I have been scoping out material on John G. Weber’s company and regiment. John G. Weber enlisted in company D, 29th Michigan Infantry on 17 August 1864, two weeks after the date printed on the broadside shown above.[2] Perhaps he answered the call to serve after viewing a similar advertisement.

Reference Notes:

[1] Civil War broadside advertising for enlistment in Michigan’s Twenty-ninth Infantry, with the text “Rally, Boys, Rally for the Flag! And Avoid the Draft,” dated 3 August 1864, Marshall, Michigan; digital image, The Archives of Michigan, Seeking Michigan (http://www.seekingmichigan.org : accessed 8 February 2015).

[2] Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in the Civil War, 1861-1865, 46 vols. (Kalamazoo, Michigan: Ihling Bros. & Everard, 1903[?]), 29: 68; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 November 2014).

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Tombstone Tuesday : Johann Georg Leonhardt & Anna Abalonia (Heinlein) Weber

Johann G. L. & Anna A. (Heinlein) Weber grave marker, St. Michael's Lutheran Cemetery, Richville, Michigan; 2012.
Johann G. L. & Anna A. (Heinlein) Weber grave marker, St. Michael’s Lutheran Cemetery, Richville, Michigan; 2012.

In honor of Veterans Day it is fitting to remember Johann Georg Leonhardt Weber (25 April 1847-21 May 1910).[1] Johann, or John, was born in Frankenmuth, the oldest child of two of Frankenmuth’s original founding settlers, Johann Conrad Weber and Kunigunde Barbara (Bernthal). John Weber fought in the American Civil War. At age seventeen he enlisted in the United States Army on 17 August 1864 in Company D, 29th Michigan Infantry.[2] The regiment participated in battles in Decatur, Alabama and Overall Creek, Winsted Church, Shelbyville Pike, and Nolansville, Tennessee.[3]

On 20 April 1876 John was married in Richville, Michigan to Anna Abalonia Heinlein (7 October 1852-19 January 1931).[4][5] The couple was married by the groom’s uncle, Rev. George Bernthal. They lived in Denmark Township, Tuscola County where John farmed.[6]

John and his wife both died in Denmark Township.[7] They are buried in St. Michael’s Lutheran Cemetery, Richville. Three children who died early are also inscribed on their grave marker.[8]

Reference Notes:

[1]Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan, Book I: (1847-1857),” (typescript, 1990, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), unpaginated, no. 4.

Tuscola County, Michigan, death certificate no. 9, John G. Weber, 21 May 1910; digital image, “Michigan, Death Records, 1897-1920,” The Archives of Michigan, Seeking Michigan (http://www.seekingmichigan.org : accessed 16 August 2012).

[2]Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in the Civil War, 1861-1865, 46 vols. (Kalamazoo, Michigan: Ihling Bros. & Everard, 1903[?]), 29: 68; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 November 2014).

[3]Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in the Civil War, 1861-1865, 29: 1 & 2.

[4]Tuscola County, Michigan, Marriage Registers [vol. ?], fo. 239, J. George Weber-Anna A. Heinlein, 30 April 1876; digital images, FamilySearch, ”Michigan, Marriages, 1868-1925” (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQS8-BQX : accessed 10 November 2014).

[5]Tuscola County, Michigan, “Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KF7N-P8X : accessed 10 November 2014), entry for Anna Abalonia Weber, 19 January 1931.

[6]1900 U.S. census, Tuscola County, Michigan, population schedule, Denmark Township, enumeration district 109, sheet no. 5 A, dwelling 96, family 97, John G. and Abelonia [sic] Weber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 November 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 744.

[7]Tuscola County, Michigan, death certificate no. 9, John G. Weber, 21 May 1910.

Tuscola County, Michigan, “Michigan, Death Certificates, 1921-1952,” database entry for Anna Abalonia Weber, 19 January 1931.

[8]St. Michael’s Lutheran Cemetery (Richville, Michigan), Johann G. L. & Anna A. Weber marker; personally read, 2012.

Tombstone Tuesday : Johann Konrad Weber

Johann Konrad Weber grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.
Johann Konrad Weber grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.

Johann Konrad Weber (01 Apr 1806-24 May 1861) was another of Frankenmuth’s 15 original settlers. At age 39, he was the eldest of the party.[1] He was married to to Kunigunda Barbara Bernthal, 18 years his junior, on 20 April 1845 aboard the Bark Caroline.[2] He passed away at 55 years of age from “dropsy of the chest” and a “lung ailment.”[3] Although the original grave marker no longer stands, his burial location is marked with two commemorative plaques.

Sources:

[1]Manifest stamped no. 391, Bark Caroline, 09 June 1845; “Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897,” Microfilm Publication M237, roll no. 058, National Archives at Washington, D.C.; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 January 2014).

[2]Huber, Elaine, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan, Book I: (1847-1857),” (typescript, 1990, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), No. 4.

[3]Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Burials (1858-1885)” (typescript, 1993, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), 1861 p. 1, “Weber, Johann Konrad”.

Tombstone Tuesday : Georg Konrad Bernthal

Georg Konrad Bernthal grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.

Georg Konrad Bernthal (28 February 1828-05 December 1893) immigrated to Frankenmuth from Roßtal, Bavaria in 1846.  He was a sibling of Tombstone Tuesday alumni Johann, Johann Leonhard, and Cunningunda (Bernthal) Weber.  He married Margaretha Barbara Hildner on 02 August 1854. Georg Konrad farmed the homestead established by his father, Georg Martin, in 1846.

Tombstone Tuesday

Cunnigunda (Bernthal) Weber grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.
Cunnigunda Weber grave marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.
Kunigunda (née Bernthal) Weber founder’s marker, St. Lorenz Lutheran Cemetery, Frankenmuth, Michigan.

Kunigunda (née Bernthal) Weber (13 February 1824-23 December 1878), along with her brother Johann Leonhard Bernthal and husband, Johann Conrad Weber, was among the fifteen original founders of Frankenmuth and St. Lorenz Lutheran Church.  Her headstone provides she died at the age of 54 years, 10 months, and 10 days. Kunigunda was buried on Christmas Day. She passed away from breast cancer.[1]

[1] Elaine Huber, translator, “St. Lorenz Lutheran Church (Frankenmuth, Michigan), Book II: Burials (1858-1885)” (typescript, 1993, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church Offices, Frankenmuth), 1878, p. 2, “Weber, Kunigunda, widow, nee Bernthal”.